, Khalifa Street , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6261112

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Vietnamese Restaurants


Shangri-La Hotel Qaryat Al Beri , Bein Al Jesrain , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-5098888

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Vietnamese Restaurants


Shangrila Hotel , Sh Zayed Road , Dubai, UAE

04-4052703

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Vietnamese Restaurants


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Non-Veg

, Sh Zayed Road , Dubai, UAE

04-3438888

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Chinese Restaurants, Seafood Restaurants, Moroccan Restaurants, Vietnamese Restaurants


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Non-Veg

Jumeirah Zabeel Saray , Palm Jumeirah , Dubai, UAE

04-4530444

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Vietnamese Restaurants



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Vietnamese Restaurants

Vietnamese cuisine is a style of cooking derived from Vietnam. Fish sauce and paste, soy paste, rice, fresh herbs, fruits and vegetables are commonly used elements for cooking. Vietnamese recipes utilize a diverse range of herbs, including lemongrass, mint, Vietnamese mint, long coriander and Thai basil leaves. Traditional Vietnamese cooking is greatly admired for its fresh ingredients, minimal use of oil, and heavy reliance on herbs and vegetables. Vietnamese food is commonly ranked as one of the healthiest cuisines in the world. The most common meats used in Vietnamese cuisine are fish, chicken, pork, beef, and various kinds of seafood. The Vietnamese also have a strong vegetarian tradition influenced by Buddhist values. The mainstream culinary traditions in all three regions of Vietnam share some fundamental features are freshness of food. Most meats are briefly cooked to preserve their original textures and colours. Vegetables are eaten fresh. If they are cooked they are boiled or only briefly stir-fried. Presence of herbs and vegetables are essential to many Vietnamese dishes and are often abundantly used. Broths or soup-based dishes are common in all three regions. The condiments that accompany Vietnamese meals are usually colourful and arranged in eye-pleasing manners. Some key features of Vietnamese culinary tradition are different from region to region. Northern Vietnam are colder climate limits the production and availability of spices. As a result, the foods here are often less spicy than those in other regions. Black pepper is used in place of chills as the most popular ingredient to produce spicy flavours. In general, Northern Vietnamese cuisine is not bold in any particular flavour - sweet, salty, spicy, bitter, or sour. Most Northern Vietnamese foods feature light and balanced flavours that result from subtle combinations of many different flavouring ingredients. The use of meats such as pork, beef, and chicken were relatively limited in the past. Freshwater fish, crustaceans, and molluscs like prawns, squids, shrimps, crabs, clams, mussels. Many notable dishes of Northern Vietnam are crab-cantered. Fish sauce, soy sauce, prawn sauce, and lime are among the main flavouring ingredients. Being the cradle of Vietnamese civilization, Northern Vietnam produces many signature dishes of Vietnam are ph?, bún riêu, bánh cu?n, which were carried to Central and Southern Vietnam through the road of Vietnamese migration. The abundance of spices produced by Central Vietnam’‘s mountainous terrain makes this region’‘s cuisine notable for its spicy food, which sets it apart from the two other regions of Vietnam where foods are mostly non-spicy. Once the capital of the last dynasty of Vietnam is Hue’‘s culinary tradition features highly decorative and colourful food, reflecting the influence of ancient Vietnamese royal cuisine. The region’‘s cuisine is notable for its sophisticated meals constituted by many complex dishes served in small portions. Chilli peppers and shrimp sauces are among the frequently used ingredients. Some Vietnamese signature dishes produced in Central Vietnam are bún bò Hu? and bánh xèo. The warm weather and fertile soil of Southern Vietnam create an ideal condition for growing a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and livestock. As a result, foods in Southern Vietnam are often vibrant and flavourful with liberal uses of garlic, shallots, and fresh herbs. Sugar is added to food more than in the other regions. The preference for sweetness in Southern Vietnam can also be seen through the widespread use of coconut milk in Southern Vietnamese cuisine. Vast shorelines make seafood a natural staple for people in this region. Southern Vietnam has also been the region where influences from foreign cuisines are most prominent. Due to some historical contact with China, Vietnam shares many of its characteristics with China. In culinary traditions, Chinese introduced to Vietnam many dishes including hoành thánh, xá xíu, há c?o, h? ti?u, mì, bò bía, bánh qu?y, mooncake and bánh pía, bánh t?, s?i dìn, bánh bò, bánh bao, com chiên Duong Châu, mì xào. Vietnamese adopted these foods and added their own styles and flavors to the foods. Ethnic minorities in the mountainous region near China-Vietnam border also adopted some foods from China. Ethnic Tày and Nùng in L?ng Son province adopted th?t l?n quay (roasted pork) and khau nh?c from China. Some New world vegetables such as chilli and maize also made way to Vietnam from the Ming dynasty. The French introduced baguettes to Vietnam, which were then combined with Vietnamese stuffing to become a popular fast food in Vietnam called bánh mì and known overseas as Vietnamese sandwich. The French also brought to Vietnam onions, cauliflower, lettuce, potatoes, tarragon, carrot, artichoke, asparagus, and coffee. Onions are called hành tây, asparagus as mang tây and potatoes are called khoai tây in Vietnamese, which reflect their origin before arriving to Vietnam. During the 17th century, contact with the Siam from India lead to the adoption of curry in Vietnamese cuisine. Though not common in the North, cà ri is a quite popular dish in central and southern Vietnam. The most common form is the chicken curry and to a lesser extent, the goat curry. The chicken curry is an indispensable dish in many social gathering events such as weddings, funerals and the yearly death anniversary of a loved one. In Vietnam, curry is eaten either with the French baguettes or with steamed rice. . Dipping sauces and condiments depending on the main dishes, such as pure fish sauce, ginger fish sauce, tamarind fish sauce, soy sauce, mu?i tiêu chanh or mu?i ?t. Small dish of relishes, such as salted eggplant, pickled white cabbage, pickled papaya, pickled garlic or pickled bean sprouts, fresh fruits or desserts. All dishes except individual bowls of rice are communal and are to be shared in the middle of the table. It is also customary for the younger to ask the elders to eat first and the women sit right next to the rice pot to serve rice for other people. A typical meal for the average Vietnamese family would include Large bowl/pot/cooker of steamed white rice, Individual bowls of rice, Fish/seafood, meat, tofu (grilled, boiled, steamed, stewed or stir-fried with vegetables), A stir-fry dish, Raw, pickled, steamed, or fresh vegetables, Canh (a clear broth with vegetables and often meat or seafood) or other soup, Prepared fish sauce for dipping, to which garlic, pepper, chili, ginger or lime juice are sometimes added according to taste.