, Yas Island , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-8107777

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European Restaurants, Spanish Restaurants


Shangri-La Hotel Qaryat Al Beri , Bein Al Jesrain , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-5098888

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Spanish Restaurants


RAK Bank Bldg , Al Khalidiya , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6660484

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Asian Restaurants, Filipino Restaurants, Italian Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants, Spanish Restaurants, Spanish Restaurants


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RAK Bank Bldg , Al Khalidiya , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6660484

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Asian Restaurants, Filipino Restaurants, Italian Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants, Spanish Restaurants, Spanish Restaurants


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Non-Veg

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Spanish Restaurants

Spain has always been an exotic land and the cuisine of this exotic land is also undoubtedly quite exotic with its own set of ethnic dishes, influences from other cuisines, and fusion cuisines. Spanish cuisine contains a diversity of utters, which stem from differences in geography, culture and climate. It is heavily influenced by seafood obtainable from the waters that surround the country, and reflects the country’‘s deep maritime roots. Spain’‘s wide-ranging history with many cultural influences has led to an array of matchless cuisines with plainly thousands of recipes and flavors. It is also well-known for its health benefits and fresh ingredients, as Mediterranean diet.The first introduction of a product to ancient Iberia was that of wheat andwheat was thought to be brought by Iberians from the south of the peninsula. It was perhaps brought from Aquitaine, due to the difficulty of transporting from the south. In time, the wheat of Iberia came to be regarded as the best in the Roman Empire, and became one of the main produces of foreign trade. The Romans’‘ early approval of wheat led to its spread from Spain to Greece and Egypt and easterly parts of Russia.There were two major kinds of diet in the peninsula. One was found in the northwest part of the peninsula, with more animal fats, that correspond to the husbandry of the north. The other could be considered the forerunner of the Mediterranean diet and was found in the southerly parts of the peninsula.As early as Roman times, with the omission of products later imported from the Americas, many modern foods were consumed, although mostly by the aristocracy, not the middle class. Cooking allusions from that era discuss the eating habits in Rome, where foods from all of the Empire’‘s provinces were brought. Thousands of amphorae of olive oil were sent to Rome from Spain. Nevertheless, and particularly in the Celtic areas, consumption of animal products from lamb and beef was more common than consumption of vegetables.Already in that era, cabbage was well known and valued, and considered a panacea for various ailments. Other popular vegetables of that time were thistles such as artichokes, and onions.In Roman Spain, the hams of Pomeipolis had great respect. The export of pork products became the basis of a strong local economy.It is almost definite that lentils were consumed in Roman Spain, because they made up a staple food for the army and since they are easy to preserve and transport. Fava beans were known from ancient times and were considered sacred by the Romans. In the Saturnalia, the later December festival in honor of Saturn, fava beans were used to choose the king of the festival. This custom is believed to be the source of the present day custom of hiding an object in the roscón de reyeswhich is similar to the sixpence traditional in a Christmas pudding; until quite recently, that object was a fava bean. Chick peas were also prevalent, chiefly among the poorer classes.Mushrooms were common and widespread in the northern part of the country.They became skilled at the science of grafting. Viticulture already was known and practiced by the Romans, but it seemed as well the fact that it was the Greeks who extended the vine across the Mediterranean region. This includes those wines that were most popular in the Empire.In this era the wealthy typically ate while lying on a couch which is a custom acquired from the Greeks and using their hands, because forks were not used for eating. Tablecloths were introduced later on. They came to use two plates, a flat onecalled platina or patella and the other, a deep onecalled catinus, which they held with the left hand. That hand could not be used for many other things while eating, given that they ate with their left arms while lounging in bed, so that only the right hand was free. They used spoons, which, like today, had different sizes, depending on what they were used for. The first spoons were made from clam shells, with silver handles.The mode of flavoring and cooking was quite distinctive from what is found in modern times. Some of the most popular dishes of the Spanish cuisine are: potato omeletteor "tortilla de patata", "tortilla española" or just "tortilla"; paella; various stews;migas; sausages such as embutidos, chorizo, and morcilla;jamónSerrano; and cheeses.There are also many dishes based on beans like chickpeas, lentils, green beans; soups, with many provincialvariants; and bread, that has many forms, with distinct varieties in each region. The regional variations are less pronounced in Spanish desserts and cakes: flan, custard, rice pudding or arroz con leche, torrijas, churros, and madeleines are some of the most typical examples.Other foods of the cuisine include:Arroz con lecheor rice pudding; Calamares a la romanaor Fried squid; Sopa de marisco; Cocidomontañés typical dish from Cantabria; Chorizo, a spicy sausage; Chuletillas which are grilled chops of milk-fed lamb; Gazpacho, a chilled tomato soup from Andalusia; Salmorejo, a chilled tomato soup thickened with bread and served with croutons of ham, egg etc.; Percebe which is typical from Galicia; Merluzaor white fish; FabadaAsturianawhich is bean stew; Fideuà; Jamónserranoor cured ham; Butifarra, a kind of sausage from Catalonia; Lechazoasado, roasted milk-fed lamb; Shellfish; Marmita which is typical from Cantabria; Pa ambtomaca, rustic bread and fresh, chopped tomato, herbs etc.; Paella or saffron rice; Peladillas, Sugared almonds, typical from Valencian Community; Pescaitofrito, battered and sometimes in adobo, is fried fish, typical from Málaga and Western Andalusia; Tortilla de patatas or tortilla españolai.e., potato omelette; Turrón, a type of nougat with almonds and honey, typical at Christmas; Polvorón, a type of Spanish shortbread, typical at Christmas; Tortas de aceite, from Seville, a sweet olive oil pastry; Olla podrida; Gofio, roasted flour used in a type of porridge in the Canary islands; and meat is also very popular in the Spanish cuisine and sheep, lamb, pork, and beef are staples.The most famous regional dish is FabadaAsturiana, a rich stew which is made with large white beans, pork shoulder, morcilla, chorizo, and saffron.Apple groves give rise to the production of the traditional alcoholic drink, a natural cider called sidra. It is a very dry cider, and unlike French or English natural ciders, uses predominantly acidic apples, rather than sweet or bittersweet.Asturian cheeses, especially Cabrales, are also famous throughout Spain and beyond; Cabrales is known for its pungent odour and strong flavour. Asturias is often called the land of cheeses due to the product’‘s diversity and quality in this region.Other major dishes include faba beans with clams, Asturian stew, frixuelos, and rice pudding.