Ground Floor, Al Reyami Building, Behind Ajman Bank , Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6449110

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Indonesian Restaurants


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Non-Veg

, Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6452008
050-9980712

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Indonesian Restaurants


, Karama , Dubai, UAE

04-3576245

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Indonesian Restaurants, Thai Restaurants, Asian Restaurants


, Karama , Dubai, UAE

04-3795501
050-4539991

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Indonesian Restaurants



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Indonesian Restaurants

The composition of Indonesia, which is made up of over 6,000 islands has offered a wide range of dishes to the collective cuisine of Indonesia, making it one of the most diverse cuisines that flaunts an extensive range of dishes, where each one is unique and offers a completely new sensation of taste when compared to the other. As a result of the islands that make up Indonesia there is quite a large amount of regional influences on the dishes and the cuisine exists based on the cultural influences that each one of the regions has on the entire Indonesian cuisine. The unique nature of the dishes and the varieties has enabled the spread of what were once purely Indonesian dishes into much of the Southeaster Asia. Some of the signature Indonesian dishes like the satay, sambal, and the beef rending have percolated through boundaries and spread throughout the world and can be found to be consumed in large amounts in places like Malaysia and Singapore where even tofu, tempe and other soy-based dishes are consumed in large quantities. The dishes of the Indonesian cuisine are always marked by the use of a spoon and a fork in the right and the left hand respectively, but most dishes are better eaten with just the hands. The end and in some cases the beginning of chowing down on the dishes of the Indonesian cuisine, is usually marked by the use of kobokan which is a bowl of tap water with a slice of water which is used to clean the hands. The use of hands or the spoon and the fork suffices for most of the Indonesian dishes, and in some rare cases even chopsticks are used to eat dishes which are influenced by the Chinese cuisine. Such dishes include the chicken noodles, the fried flat rice noodles, the fried noodles and the wontons. As one can ascertain from the majority of the dishes found in any typical Indonesian cuisine Rice is the staple food and plays a significant role in the shaping and the propagation of the Indonesian cuisine. The rice is in most cases consumed in the form of plain rice with some vegetables for the sides and some proteins too. In some places that flaunt the Indonesian cuisine one might even find signature Indonesian dishes like the rice cooked with coconut, the rice cooked with turmeric and coconut milk, the rice steamed in woven coconut fronds packets, rice steamed with banana leaves rice crackers, the rice desserts, the fired rice and the Nas goreng. The use of rice in Indonesian cuisine which eventually came to be the most significant and irreplaceable part of it was firmly established only after the rice was added to their diets and the technology to improve it was obtained. The use of rice is traced back to 3000 BCE, and thus one can in a manner assume that this was the faint start of the Indonesian cuisine. While rice plays a large part in the staple foods the Indonesian cuisine dishes there are other staple foods too, like the tubers, the sweet potatoes, the yams, the cassavas the taros, the bread fruits, the jack fruits, wheat and maize. The Indonesian cuisine adds flavors to its range of staple by a selection of quite a range of leafy vegetables like the spinach, genjer, Kangkung, melinjo,cassava leaves and papaya. Garlic is often used as the sautéing agent for most of these vegetables. When it comes to the vegetables that one might spot from said list in a restaurant that offers Indonesian cuisine, one is likely to come across spinach soup or corn soup which is usually prepared to in a clear watery composition, termed sayur bayam bening. The soups that one finds in the Indonesian recipe are usually flavored with the temu kunci, shallot and the garlic. Stir fries, curries and other types of soup too can be found in the Indonesian cuisine, and the usual range of vegetables used for these soups includes the calabash, the yard long bean, the chayoute, and eggplants. The dishes that one might find in the Indonesian Cuisine featuring said list of vegetables include the sayur asem, laksa which is otherwise known as the sayur lodeh, of which the former is usually made up of cabbage, potato, cauliflower, carrot and macaroni. The need to spice things up is ever present and the list of spices that is used in the Indonesian cuisines includes the black pepper, shallot, and garlic. The vegetable items that one might find in an Indonesian cuisine are quite extensive as is obvious and includes some unique disehes like the cap cai which is a famous mixed vegetable stir. Speaking of unique, there are some vegetables in the Indonesian cuisines, whose dish form is the same as their natural form. That is the dishes that one might find in the Indonesian cuisine, consisting of these vegetables, in some cases is just the raw vegetable itself. Such vegetables include the cucumber, the bitter melon, and the winged bean. The bitter melon in some cases are eaten raw, and in some cases boiled before it is eaten. Falling into a relatively rare category of vegetables to be spotted in the Indonesian cuisine are the papaya flower buds and the kecobrag. Other than the wide use of vegetables, yet another signature ingredient being used in the Indonesian cuisine is the peanuts which are used in a wide range. Most Indonesian dishes have in them peanuts in one form or the other. The usual range of such dishes includes the gado-gado, the pecel, the karedok, ketoprak and the satay. Some of the dishes in the Indonesian cuisine which has peanuts in them to be their signature ingredients are considered the national dishes, like the Gadogado and the Sate. All the spices, the peanut sauce and the coconut milk combinations are used for the meat and fish dishes that are part of the Indonesian cuisine, a significant part at that. Despite the main meat dishes in the Indonesian cuisine being that of poultry and some fish, there are a wide range of dishes that are made out of beef, goats, muttons, and water buffalos. Most of the food that one finds in an Indonesian cuisine follows the halal dietary law, and thus the lack of pork in the large range of Indonesian range of dishes. However, the wide variety and the diversity of dishes that one affords in opting for the Indonesian cuisine makes up for any lack of a particular type of meat in the cuisine range. The end of any good Indonesian meal, and what makes any Indonesian cuisine complete or any cuisine for that matter are the desserts and the Indonesian realm of desserts includes the escendol and esdoger and the klappertart. Each on these desserts, like the many dishes that one finds in the Indonesian cuisine is quite unique, except for the fact that most of the desserts consist of coconut milk in them which adds to the yum factor of the desserts and helps make a perfect end to a perfect Indonesian meal which reflects the variety and the combination of influences that is Indonesia.