Somali Road , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2737432

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African Restaurants, Ethiopian Restaurants


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, Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2737432

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Somali Road , Frij Murar , Dubai, UAE

04-2718183

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Near Gulf Hotel , Dubai, UAE

04-2710677

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Near Ethiopian Airline, Nasr Square , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2217202
050-2979074

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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, Ajman, UAE

055-8508702

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Opp Post Office, AlDiwan Building , Al Qassimia , Sharjah, UAE

06-5734464

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Behind Post Office , Abu Hail , Dubai, UAE

04-2667358

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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, Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-4912128

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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, Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2208477

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Ethiopian Restaurants


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Egyptian Restaurants

The variety of Egyptian recipes is endless. They go back a very long way. As a result of subsequent colonization, foreign influence is somewhat present, specially from the Turkish cuisine (it is understandable after more than 300 years of Turkish presence in Egypt). The "Pashas" living in Cairo mainly employed the natives as help and cooks. Their kitchen doors opened to people with their cooking secrets and, hence, Turkish food became part of the present world. Archaeological excavations have found that workers on the Great Pyramids of Giza were paid in bread, beer, and onion, apparently their usual diet as peasants in the Egyptian countryside. The Dental analysis of occasional desiccated loaves found in tombs confirms this, in addition to demonstrating that early Egyptian bread was made with flour from emmer wheat. Beer disappeared as a mainstay of Egyptian life following the Muslim conquest of Egypt in the year 654 and onions remain the primary vegetable for flavouring and nutrition in Egyptian food. Beans were also a primary source of protein for the mass of the Egyptian populace, as they remain today. Today, Egypt cuisine ranges from the native traditional dishes to many international delicacies. Basically Egyptian cuisine is the mixture of Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Palestine and Syrian food culture yet it tastes different and that is the uniqueness of Egyptian food. Egyptians are very fond of strong flavour such as garlic and onions. Variety of Egyptian cuisine is very extensive and it utilizes wide varieties of vegetables. Food in the south of Egypt is spicier and mouth watering in comparison of north Egypt and it is because of the influence of North African cuisine. Recipes gathered here are those known to the common Egyptian, irrelevant of their origin. Their names in Arabic are the ones we all know and use. Ingredients used are very easily found in Middle East/Oriental specialty stores. Egyptian cuisine is notably conducive to vegetarian diets, as it relies heavily on vegetable dishes. Though food in Alexandria and the coast of Egypt tends to use a great deal of fish and other seafood, for the most part Egyptian cuisine is based on foods that grow out of the ground. Meat has been very expensive for most Egyptians throughout history, and a great deal of vegetarian dishes have developed to work around this economic reality. Egypt cuisine is mainly known for its flavor and use of fresh ingredients. Molokhiyya is a popular green leafy summer vegetable, which Egyptians widely used in making variety of dishes along with other vegetables. Rice along with bread is the food of Egyptian main courses i.e. lunch and dinner. Among the national dishes of Egypt, Ful medames is the national dish often eaten at breakfast. Another popular traditional dish is Kushari. It is also a national dish and consists of base of rice along with black lentils, chickpeas, macaroni and garlic, vinegar and spicy tomato sauce as the topping. Egyptian cuisine also consists of Mezze, small dishes served with drinks. Kebabs in different flavor are the high point of Egyptian food and recipes. Hamaam (small pigeons) and fish are the other flavored non-vegetarian dishes of Egypt. In modern Egypt, the government subsidizes bread, dating back to a Nasser-era policy. In 2008, a major food crisis caused ever-longer bread lines at government-subsidized bakeries where there would normally be none; occasional fights broke out over bread, leading to fear of rioting.[2] Egyptian dissidents and outside observers of the former National Democratic Party regime frequently criticized the bread subsidy as an attempt to buy off the Egyptian urban working classes in order to encourage acceptance of the authoritarian system; nevertheless, the subsidy has continued after the 2011 Revolution. As it is obvious, Egyptian dishes are diverse just like the people of the nation. Egyptian dishes are known for their taste and flavour. It can be guaranteed that if anyone walks into a Egyptian restaurant, that they will be assured of enjoying a good meal. As many people have started following the Egyptian cuisine, many innovations and changes are being made with the dishes and people can be pretty sure that the innovations are going to make the dishes delicious. As a result, a number of restaurants featuring the Egyptian cuisines as the primary theme have popped up throughout the world and has a steady flow of customers from across the globe owing to the universal popularity of the Egyptian cuisine which is a result of the amalgam of delicate flavours and mouth watering dishes which keep the ones who opt for the Egyptian cuisine coming back for more. In a culinary level, bread is most commonly used as an edible utensil besides providing the carbohydrate and much of the protein in the Egyptian diet. Egyptians use bread to scoop up food, sauces, and dips and to wrap kebabs, falafel, and the like in the manner of sandwiches. Most pita breads are baked at high temperatures (450°F or 232°C), causing the flattened rounds of dough to puff up dramatically. When removed from the oven, the layers of baked dough remain separated inside the deflated pita, which allows the bread to be opened into pockets, creating a space for use in various dishes. Aish Merahrah is Egyptian flat bread made with 5-10% ground fenugreek seeds and maize. It is part of the traditional diet of the Egyptian countryside, prepared locally in village homes. The loaves are flat and wide, and usually about 50 cm in diameter. The bread is made of maize flour that has been made into soft dough that is fermented overnight with a sourdough starter, shaped into round loaves that are then allowed to rise or "proof" for 30 minutes before being flattened into round disks, which are then baked. They can be kept for days in an airtight container. The addition of fenugreek seeds increases the protein content, storage length and digestibility of the bread; on the other hand, it causes the eater to exude a distinctive odour in his or her sweat, which is occasionally mocked by more urban Egyptians.