Mall of the Emirates, Barsha , Al Rahba , Dubai, UAE

04-3416218

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Belgian Restaurants, Cafes Restaurants


Tilal Liwa Hotel , Madinat Zayed , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-8946111

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Belgian Restaurants


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, Jumeirah , Dubai, UAE

04-3428100

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Belgian Restaurants, Seafood Restaurants


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Belgian Restaurants

In Belgium big cuisine comes before fine cuisine and it is often said that Belgian cuisine involves serving food of French quality in German quantities. This is why Belgium has often been called a nation of gourmands rather than gourmets. The cuisine has many popular dishes. In particular fries, which are deep-fried chipped potatoes, are very popular in Belgium. In special places called friteries, frietkot, fritkot, or frituur one can buy fries in Belgium. In these places the fries are served with a large variety of sauces and are eaten either on their own or in the company of other snacks such as fricandelle or burgers. These fries are traditionally served in a "cornet de frites" which is a conic white piece of cardboard and then wrapped in a piece of paper, with a good spoonful of sauce on the top. Along with the fries they serve many traditional fastfood products such as frikandel, gehaktbal or kroket.Friteries and other fast-food establishments incline towards offering a number of diverse sauces for the fries and meats. Along with ketchup and mayonnaise, it is common to offer many others.The popular options for sauces includes:Aioli or Look-sauce which is garlic mayonnaise sauce;Pepper-saucewhich is mayonnaise with green pepper;Sauce Andalousewhich is mayonnaise with tomato paste and peppers;Sauce Americainewhich is mayonnaise with tomato, chervil, onions, capers and celery;Bicky Dressing or GeleBicky-sauce which is a commercial brand made from mayonnaise, white cabbage, tarragon, cucumber, onion, mustard and dextrose; Curry mayonnaise;Mammoet-sauce which is mayonnaise, tomato, onion, glucose, garlic, and soy sauce;Sauce "Pickles" which is a yellow mayonnaise-based sauce with turmeric, mustard and crunchy vegetable chunks, similar to Piccalilli;Samurai-sauce which is mayonnaise with sambaloelek; Tartar sauce; and Zigeuner sauce which isa gypsy sauce of tomatoes, paprika and chopped bell peppers borrowed from Germany. These sauces are generally also made available in supermarkets. Infrequently, hot sauces are offered by friteries. These sauces include hollandaise sauce, sauce provençale, Béarnaise sauce or even a splash carbonadeflamande stew from an ever-bubbling pot, in the spirit of British Chips and Gravy.For a reasonably small country, Belgium produces a very large number of beers in anarray of different styles.In fact, Belgium has more dissimilar types of beer per head than anywhere else in the world wherealmost every style of beer has its own particular, uniquely shaped glass or other drinking-vessel.A number of customary Belgian dishes use beer as an ingredient. One of these dishes is Carbonadewhich is a stew of beef cooked in beer and is similar to Boeuf bourguignon. The beer used is typically the regional speciality—lambic in Brussels, De Koninck in Antwerp, and so on — and because of this reason, the taste of the dish always varies. Another of the dishes that use beer as an ingredient is rabbit in gueuze. In’‘tSpinnekopke, Brussels, and Den Dyver, Bruges are famous Belgiun citieswell-known for their beer cookery.The varied nature of Belgian beers makes it probable to match them against each course of a meal, for instancewheat beer with seafood or fish, blonde beers or tripel with chicken or white meat, dubbel or other dark beers with dark meat, fruit lambics with dessert, and so on. Belgium is well known for its chocolate. Belgian chocolate is considered to be the gourmet standard by which all other chocolate confections are measured. Even the Swiss, who are known for their own high quality chocolate, imported their basic recipes from the French and Belgian chocolatiers. The quality of ingredients,of which many facets of its composition are controlled by law, and an observanceof Old World manufacturing techniques are what make Belgian chocolates matchless. Most Belgian chocolatesare still made by hand in shops using original equipment even in today’‘s world of mechanization and mass production. For tourists visiting Belgium in the present, these small chocolate outlets are, and have always been, a popular draw. Seafood pralines of the Belgian cuisine are popular with tourists and are sold all over Belgium. ChocolaterieGuylian for example, makes the pralines asper the recipe from the company’‘s founding father Guy Foubert who fashioned it in the Sixties. The praliné is still made to this same secret recipe, in the age-old traditional manner, even today. This is a pure example of process that is typical for the manufacture ofBelgian chocolates and this is what makes them unique.Typical Belgian cuisine dishes include: Moules-frites orMosselen-friet which are mussels and chips; Konijn in geuzeor Lapin à la gueuze which is rabbit in geuze, a spontaneously fermented sour beer from the area around Brussels; Stoemp which is potato mashed with vegetables, usually carrots or cabbage, often served with sausages; SaladeLiégeoiseorLuiksesalade which is a salad with green beans, pieces of bacon, onions and vinegar, associated with Liège; VlaamsestoofkarbonadenorCarbonnadesflamandes which is a Flemish beef stew similar to the French Beef Bourguignon, but made with beer instead of red wine; Waterzooi, a rich stew or soup of chicken or sometimes fish along with vegetables, cream and eggs, associated with Ghent; Paling in ‘‘t groenorAnguilles au vert which iseel in a green sauce of mixed herbs; GegratineerdwitlooforChicons au gratin which is a gratin of chicory in béchamel sauce with cheese; and BoterhammenorTartines which areslices of rustic bread and an uncovered spread, often pâté or soft cheese, served on a board and eaten with knife and fork. A typical variety of this is a slice of bread with quark and sliced radishes, typically accompanied by a glass of gueuze. Some other common dishes that belong to the cuisine are: Tomate-crevetteorTomaat-garnaal which is a snack or starter of grey shrimp in mayonnaise stuffed into a hollowed-out raw tomato; Pêches au thon orPerziken met tonijn which is halved canned or fresh peaches stuffed with a mix of tuna and mayonnaise, i.e. tuna salad; and PensenorBoudins which is a type of sausage in which the meat or blood content is mixed with fine breadcrumbs and often eaten with potatoes and apple sauce, sometimes eaten raw or barbequed. Waffles which are sometimes eaten as a street snack have two main styles, Brussels and Liège. Kip met frieten en appelmoes which is chicken, French fries and apple sauce is another popular dish of the cuisine. Charcuterie, or cold meat products, particularly smoked ham,Jambond’‘Ardenne and paté, which may be made of game such as wild boar are renowned types of dishes in the Ardennes region.